Trip to Bolton Abbey

Yesterday I visited Bolton Abbey, so I thought I would share my pictures with you. The priory ruins and surrounding area are very picturesque, and there are lots of spots perfect for picnics (we had ours at the brilliantly named Valley of Desolation!).

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

I think the photo above is my favourite- very dramatic!

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

My favourite place name ever. It sounds like one of Enid Blyton’s stories- I think there was a series with names like the Valley of Adventure etc

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

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Voting: Round 2 of The Book Awards 2015

Voting is open for The Writing Hufflepuff’s book awards!

The Writing Hufflepuff

Find out here what The Book Awards are and click here to see the list of all the nominees.

Warning: There will be spoilers!

So I figured out what I did wrong with the poll yesterday. It’s very stupid and it basically comes down to me being an idiot. Anyway, I figured it out and now it’s time to vote!

Like I explained in yesterday’s post, this round is only for categories with more than five nominees. If a nominee has been nominated more than once, like Harry Potter being nominated nine times for Best Book Series, it automatically goes to round 3. This means that some categories have five spots, others, like Best Male Author, have two. The nominees with the most votes go through to the next round. I hope everything is clear, and if not, do not hesitate to ask!

I don’t know why Best…

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Day out in London- Easter holiday 2015

First of all- Happy Easter, and sorry I haven’t posted in a while!

Last week, my brother and I went to visit our grandparents, and while there we visited London. I thought I’d share my photos, since the buildings we visited were pretty impressive.

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Temple Church

I’ve wanted to visit this for ages, since it’s mentioned in The Da Vinci Code (Dan Brown). It was built by the Knights Templar in the 12th century next to what is now Fleet Street. Despite this being a well known patch of London (and Monopoly!), the church itself is relatively hidden. It’s one of those places you find by accident- or, in our case, after consulting various maps.

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

The round part of the church you see above was built in 1185 (won’t say anymore, since Robert Langdon explains it far better as the main character of The Da Vinci Code!); this bit below was built in 1240.

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

The inside of the church wasn’t really to my taste, though the stained glass windows were fabulous and the church itself is photogenic. It seemed cold and impersonal, which is odd considering its wealth of history.

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

This probably isn’t a technically “good” photo, but I like the faint colours of the stained glass shining on the knight. It makes him seem a little less lifeless, and more like someone who had a history.

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Again, technically not great. I like the streams of light coming through the window- I actually messed with the brightness on my camera to make them whiter. I think it gives an unearthly effect. I might try painting it sometime.

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

 


Royal Courts of Justice

We were lucky with this one- the next day there was a fire in the area and the building had to be evacuated. Unfortunately, photography isn’t allowed inside the courts, so my only photos are from outside. We hadn’t thought visitors were permitted, though, so I suppose I can’t complain about being unable to take photos if I didn’t think I would be allowed in in the first place!

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Though not exactly welcoming, I think it’s an impressive building. I don’t know much about architecture (read: absolutely nothing), so this may be completely the wrong term, but I feel like “gothic” suits it quite well.


St Clement Danes Church

Oranges and lemons say the bells of St Clement’s (if my memory serves me right)

The RAF’s church, St Clement Danes, is next door-ish to the Royal Courts. Despite being in the middle of a bustling street, it was very quiet when we visited. It was easily my favourite, because it was much more personal than Temple Church without losing its grandeur.

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley

Photo: Scribbley


I hope you enjoyed looking at the pictures- though I know there were a lot of them! The churches in particular were beautiful to look round, so if you’re into photography or if you like wandering round churches and old buildings like me I’d recommend visiting them if you are ever in London. They’re at least a bit different to the “usual” attractions- plus they don’t cost the earth!

Love is overrated and so are you

I thought this was a wise outlook on love, so I thought I’d share it 💕

eat more, sleep less, dream plenty

It is disturbing how we romanticize the idea of hurting ourselves in the name of love. I cannot fathom why we wouldn’t mind or even crave the feeling of having someone else trace a blade around our lips like a stencil, burn cigarette holes into the thin lining of our skin or bleed us out on sterile tiles in blossoming scarlet stains. We degrade and dehumanize ourselves for the other half, laying bare our souls for them to grind our bones to grainy powder – all for one simple reason. We want to matter. We’re not content with being just another face in the sea of the faceless. We need to cling on to an anchor, even if its jagged edges splices us into two. The universe, as it appears, owes us that much, and if love can achieve that purpose of filling the cavernous pits in our hearts, so…

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Seeing “The weight of One Self”

Another Voice

"The weight of One Self" - marble sculpture of height 2.7m by artists Michael Elmgreen & Ingar Dragset, in Lyon, France. “The weight of One Self” – sculpture of height 2.7m by artists Michael Elmgreen & Ingar Dragset, in Lyon, France.

I look at my limp
body in my arms and I
wonder who saved whom.
I can only hold
the weight of my own conscience,
talk the truth I know.
Never a hero
was made by saving himself-
Completely untrue.

You can read more about this philosophically forceful sculpture here.

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Road to Nowhere

I thought the insight into the photographer’s process of taking and editing a photo was interesting- plus I liked the photo!

Life in a Photograph

Road to Nowhere

Old photo, edited today! I’ve always liked this one but had no idea what to do with it when I took it, two years ago. I found it again today and after looking at it for a while, two thoughts popped in my mind… the first one was coffee, the second one was that there’s something here! I saw the road, the fog and i thought “Hey, maybe we can turn this otherwise crappy photo into something mysterious, intriguing and dramatic!” I high-fived my brain and started to work (I made a cup of coffee first!). 49 minutes later, this photo was born and I really like it now! 🙂
I’m not a huge fan of the complete white sky but i don’t like to merge two photos to create one, I’ve done that once and while I thought it looked good on my laptop, when i saw it on…

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